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This is an Expedition!

By RaftArizona • January 1, 2018

The journey through the majestic Colorado River corridor is unparalleled. Upon embarking on our trip into the canyon, we are completely self-sufficient in a wilderness environment for days on end. We don’t pipe in internet or have the ability to fly in extra amenities. You will sometimes be uncomfortable and stretched in ways you never thought you could be, but the canyon will show you how tough you really are. Trips with ARR don’t require you to be a triathlete; but you do need to have an adventurous spirit, be in good physical health, and have a desire to escape into the Grand Canyon wilderness.

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The early days of commercial rafting trips

In the 1960’s commercial rafting in the Grand Canyon was a tough endeavor. For daily rations, passengers ate cans of beans, tomatoes, and corn. Initiation was a bucket of water and mud dumped on the head and a little bit of mild spanking with an oar. Georgie White “Woman of the River” is a bit of a controversial figure in Grand Canyon history. She was a pioneer of commercial motorized rafting and a legend in the canyon. She purchased surplus rafts from the military and lashed them together to make huge G-rigs. Her trips were much cheaper than her competition as she took large groups on a no-frills style trip. The rapid at river mile 24 is named Georgie Rapid in honor of her. Watch the video below to learn more about trips “back in the day” and this iconic figure:

Rafting trips today

Since then, we’ve refined our trips a bit. Our meals are hearty and healthy, our rafts are sleek and tough, we provide camp chairs and cots to improve comfort, and our guides have decades of experience navigating the mighty Colorado River. We believe it is important to continually innovate and improve our trips. We ask all of our guests to provide feedback after their adventure down the canyon. These wonderful folks share their feedback along with stories about how nervous they were to camp along the river and how it’s not always easy, but certainly rewarding. What these “River Rats” will tell you, is whatever comfort zone you leave behind, will be replaced with a personal fortitude and an experience that traverses the boundaries of the sublime.